Top 100 Genealogy Websites for 2014

Top 100 Genealogy Websites for 2014
Rank Website Category Country Free Pay 2013 Rank Address
1 Ancestry.com records USA pay 1 http://www.ancestry.com/
2 Find A Grave cemetery USA free 3 http://www.findagrave.com/
3 FamilySearch records USA free 4 https://www.familysearch.org/
4 MyHeritage.com family tree USA pay 2 http://www.myheritage.com/
5 Geni.com family tree USA pay 5 http://www.geni.com/
6 Ancestry.co.uk records UK pay 6 http://www.ancestry.co.uk/
7 GeneaNet family tree France free 8 http://www.geneanet.org/
8 Archives.com records USA pay 7 http://www.archives.com/
9 Genealogy.com records USA pay 9 http://genealogy.com/
10 Genealogy Bank newspapers USA pay 11 http://www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/
11 Eastman’s Newsletter blog USA free 22 http://blog.eogn.com/
12 Ancient Faces forum USA free 12 http://www.ancientfaces.com/
13 Arkivverket Digitalarkivet records Norway free 13 http://arkivverket.no/eng/content/view/full/629
14 Family Tree DNA DNA testing USA pay 17 http://www.familytreedna.com/
15 Ancestry.ca records Canada pay 19 http://www.ancestry.ca/
16 GenealogyInTime Magazine magazine Canada free 21 http://www.genealogyintime.com/
17 Ancestry.com.au records Australia pay 16 http://www.ancestry.com.au/
18 FindMyPast UK records UK pay 14 http://www.findmypast.co.uk/
19 Fold3 records USA pay 20 http://www.fold3.com/
20 MyHeritage.no family tree Norway pay 18 http://www.myheritage.no/
21 WikiTree family tree USA free 31 http://www.wikitree.com/
22 Newspaper Archive newspapers USA pay 13 http://www.newspaperarchive.com/
23 Roots Chat forum UK free 42 http://rootschat.com/
24 Mundia family tree USA pay 39 http://www.mundia.com/
25 Genealogie.com family tree France pay 23 http://www.genealogie.com/
26 Newspapers.com newspapers USA pay 78 http://www.newspapers.com/
27 Genealogy.About.com articles USA free 28 http://genealogy.about.com/
28 Mocavo search engine USA pay 25 http://www.mocavo.com/
29 MyFamily forum USA pay 10 https://www.myfamily.com/
30 Genes Reunited records UK pay 24 http://www.genesreunited.co.uk/
31 JTA Jewish News Archive newspapers USA free 32 http://archive.jta.org/
32 USGenweb Archives records USA free 26 http://usgwarchives.net/
33 JewishGen ethnic heritage USA free 34 http://www.jewishgen.org/
34 DIS-Norway society Norway free n/a http://www.disnorge.no
35 Steve Morse search engine USA free 56 http://stevemorse.org/
36 MyHeritage.es family tree Spain pay 37 http://www.myheritage.es/
37 Cyndi’s List links USA free 35 http://cyndislist.com/
38 EllisIsland.org records USA free 30 http://www.ellisisland.org/
39 World Vital Records records USA pay 29 http://www.worldvitalrecords.com/
40 Genealogy Trails records USA free 50 http://genealogytrails.com/
41 Family Tree Magazine magazine USA pay 43 http://www.familytreemagazine.com/
42 Free BMD records UK free 36 http://www.freebmd.org.uk/
43 American Ancestors society USA pay 38 http://www.americanancestors.org/
44 ProGenealogists services USA pay 81 http://www.progenealogists.com/
45 Tribal Pages family tree USA pay 44 http://tribalpages.com/
46 Billion Graves cemetery USA free 110 http://billiongraves.com/
47 British History Online records UK free 59 http://www.british-history.ac.uk/
48 ScotlandsPeople records Scotland pay 53 http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk/
49 Legacy Family Tree software USA pay 51 http://www.legacyfamilytree.com/
50 Fulton History newspapers USA free 45 http://fultonhistory.com/
51 MyHeritage.fr family tree France pay 49 http://www.myheritage.fr/
52 Daughters American Revolution society USA pay 57 http://dar.org/
53 Ahnenforschung.net forum Germany free 65 http://ahnenforschung.net/
54 Genealogie Online family tree Netherlands pay 85 http://www.genealogieonline.nl/
55 MyHeritage.de family tree Germany pay 40 http://www.myheritage.de/
56 Genoom family tree Spain free 70 http://www.genoom.com/
57 British Newspaper Archive newspapers UK pay 66 http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/
58 Genealogy Today records USA pay 67 http://genealogytoday.com/
59 FindMyPast.com records USA pay 48 http://www.findmypast.com
60 Roots Ireland records Ireland pay 83 http://www.rootsireland.ie/
61 RootsMagic software USA pay 63 http://www.rootsmagic.com/
62 thePeerage records UK free 60 http://thepeerage.com/
63 Canada’s Anglo-Celtic Connections blog Canada free 95 http://anglo-celtic-connections.blogspot.com/
64 WieWasWie records Netherlands free 104 https://www.wiewaswie.nl/
65 MyHeritage.pl family tree Poland pay 69 http://www.myheritage.pl/
66 Interment cemetery USA free 55 http://interment.net/
67 MyTrees family tree USA pay 52 http://www.mytrees.com/
68 FamilyLink records USA pay 41 http://www.familylink.com/
69 Family Tree Webinars magazine USA pay n/a http://www.familytreewebinars.com
70 Genuki records UK free 58 http://genuki.org.uk/
71 MyHeritage.com.br family tree Brazil pay 64 http://www.myheritage.com.br/
72 Forces War Records records UK pay 72 http://www.forces-war-records.co.uk/
73 MyHeritage.nl family tree Netherlands pay 61 http://www.myheritage.nl/
74 The Genealogist records UK pay 92 http://www.thegenealogist.co.uk/
75 Ancestry.se records Sweden pay 109 http://www.ancestry.se/
76 Family Tree Maker software USA pay 62 http://familytreemaker.com/
77 Commonwealth War Graves records UK free 93 http://www.cwgc.org/
78 Dansk Demografisk Database records Denmark free 144 http://ddd.dda.dk/ddd_en.htm
79 Irish Genealogical Research Society society Ireland pay n/a http://www.irishancestors.ie/
80 FindMyPast Ireland records Ireland pay 116 http://www.findmypast.ie/
81 Geneabloggers blog USA free 89 http://www.geneabloggers.com/
82 Heritage Quest Online records USA pay 74 http://www.heritagequestonline.com/
83 Ancestry.de records Germany pay 68 http://www.ancestry.de/
84 sysoon cemetery USA free 46 http://www.sysoon.com/
85 Death Indexes links USA free 76 http://www.deathindexes.com/
86 We Relate wiki USA free 54 http://www.werelate.org/
87 Gould Genealogy services Australia pay 157 http://www.gouldgenealogy.com/
88 Geneawiki wiki France free 86 http://www.geneawiki.com/
89 Genea-Musings blog USA free 80 http://www.geneamusings.com/
90 MyHeritage.se family tree Sweden pay n/a http://www.myheritage.se/
91 Volksbund records Germany free 134 http://www.volksbund.de/
92 ObituariesHelp.org links USA free 47 http://www.obituarieshelp.org/
93 MyHeritage.it family tree Italy pay 100 http://www.myheritage.it/
94 Access Genealogy search engine USA free 71 http://www.accessgenealogy.com/
95 Ontario Genealogical Society society Canada free 77 http://www.ogs.on.ca/
96 Automated Genealogy records Canada free 73 http://www.automatedgenealogy.com/
97 Ancestry.fr records France pay n/a http://www.ancestry.fr/
98 USGenweb Project records USA free 113 http://www.usgenweb.org/
99 Familiaridade family tree Brazil free 142 http://www.familiaridade.com.br/
100 Irish Genealogy records Ireland free 117 http://www.irishgenealogy.ie/
Posted in Web

Get Person

A surname or family name is a name added to a given name. In many cases, a surname is a family name and many dictionaries define “surname” as a synonym of “family name”. In the western hemisphere, it is commonly synonymous with “last name”, since it is usually placed at the end of a person’s given name.

In most Hispanophone and Lusophone countries, two or more last names (or surnames) may be used. In China, Hungary, Japan, Korea, Madagascar, Nepal, Vietnam, parts of India and in many other East Asian countries, the family name is placed before a person’s given name.

The style of having both a family name (surname) and a given name (forename) is far from universal. In many countries, it is common for ordinary people to have only one name or mononym.

The concept of a “surname” is a relatively recent historical development, evolving from a medieval naming practice called a “byname”. Based on an individual’s occupation or area of residence, a byname would be used in situations where more than one person had the same name.

Click on a surname to show matching records. Main surname page | Show all surnames

 

1. MYLES (70)
2. HALL (29)
3. SIMMONS (23)
4. JOHNSON (18)
5. DAVIS (16)
6. BELL (15)
7. KING (15)
8. TABOR (15)
9. LOWE (14)
10. SAWYER (14)
11. GANISON (13)
12. HARRIS (9)
13. WHEELER (8)
14. ROBINSON (6)
15. WALKER (6)
16. () MYLES (5)
17. BROWN (5)
18. KEYS (5)
19. SMITH (5)
20. AMPEY (4)
21. BOSHAW (4)
22. BROOKS (4)
23. BRUNSON (4)
24. CORBIN (4)
25. DABNEY (4)
26. GINN (4)
27. GRUNDAY (4)
28. GRUNDY (4)
29. PITTMAN (4)
30. REECE (4)
31. WASHINGTON (4)
32. GANISON (3)
33. () BROOKS (3)
34. ALLEN (3)
35. COOKE (3)
36. DAVENPORT (3)
37. ELDRIDGE (3)
38. FARMER (3)
39. FRANKLIN (3)
40. MAXWELL (3)
41. MILLER (3)
42. ODOM (3)
43. SOMMERS (3)
44. STEWART (3)
45. STOKES (3)
46. TABER (3)
47. WALLS (3)
48. WHITE (3)
49. WILLIAMS (3)
50. WOODY (3)
51. () (2)
52. () HALL (2)
53. () HARRIS (2)
54. () KING (2)
55. () TABOR (2)
56. (WILLIAMS) MYLES (2)
57. BERRY (2)
58. COLEMAN (2)
59. CUFFEE (2)
60. DILLON (2)
61. EPPERSON (2)
62. GERARD (2)
63. GRAY (2)
64. GREENE (2)
65. HARDIN (2)
66. HAYWOOD (2)
67. HOLLOWAY (2)
68. HOWELL (2)
69. INGRAM (2)
70. LAPOINTE (2)
71. MCCULLUM (2)
72. MCMILLON (2)
73. MUN (2)
74. NIMLEY (2)
75. PRICE (2)
76. ROBERTS (2)
77. SANDERS (2)
78. SEARCY (2)
79. STAFFORD (2)
80. SUTTON (2)
81. TABOR / TABER (2)
82. TALIAFERRO (2)
83. THOMPSON (2)
84. WALTON (2)
85. WATSON (2)
86. WILLIS (2)
87. () CORBIN (1)
88. () CUFFEE (1)
89. () GANISON (1)
90. () HOLLOWAY (1)
91. () LOWE (1)
92. () SAWYER (1)
93. () SIMMONS (1)
94. () SOMMERS (1)
95. () THOMAS (1)
96. () WHEELER (1)
97. (AMPEY) SMITH (1)
98. (AMPEY) WOODY (1)
99. (AMPEY) YOUNGER (1)
100. (BELL) GREEN (1)
101. (BRADLEY) AMPEY (1)
102. (BROOKS) WHEELER (1)
103. (COX) SIMMONS (1)
104. (CUFFEE) MYLES (1)
105. (DAVENPORT) STEWART (1)
106. (DAVIS) SUTTON (1)
107. (EPPERSON) ALLEN (1)
108. (FLETCHER) MYLES (1)
109. (GANISON) ROBERTS (1)
110. (GANISON) TIDWELL (1)
111. (GAULDIN) PITTMAN (1)
112. (GILLESPIE) MYLES (1)
113. (GILLUM) MYLES (1)
114. (GRUNDY) HALL (1)
115. (HALL) FLETCHER (1)
116. (HALL) INGRAM (1)
117. (HALL) JOHNSON (1)
118. (HALL) WALKER ROBINSON (1)
119. (HANNA) MYLES (1)
120. (HARRIS) MAXWELL (1)
121. (HARRIS) MYLES (1)
122. (HENDERSON) JOHNSON (1)
123. (HINES) KING (1)
124. (HOLLOWAY) KING SMITH (1)
125. (HUMPHREY) TABOR (1)
126. (IVERY) LOWE (1)
127. (JOHNSON) KING (1)
128. (JOHNSON) KING GANTT (1)
129. (JOHNSON) MCMILLON (1)
130. (JOHNSON) STOKES (1)
131. (KEYS) FRIDAY (1)
132. (KEYS) PEEPLES (1)
133. (KEYS) STANSBERRY (1)
134. (KIMBROUGH) LOWE (1)
135. (KING) HARRIS (1)
136. (KING) MORAN (1)
137. (KING) MYLES (1)
138. (KING) WAGNER (1)
139. (LOWE) EPPERSON (1)
140. (LOWE) KEYS (1)
141. (LOWE) SIMMONS (1)
142. (MARSHALL) DAVIS (1)
143. (MECHEM) BOSHAW (1)
144. (MYLES) (1)
145. (MYLES) BELL (1)
146. (MYLES) BRUNSON (1)
147. (MYLES) GANISON (1)
148. (MYLES) MCCULLUM (1)
149. (MYLES) SAWYER (1)
150. (MYLES) TALIAFERRO (1)
151. (NEAL) TABOR PAYNE (1)
152. (ODOM) STAFFORD (1)
153. (PAPAZIAN) BROWN (1)
154. (PARKER) KING (1)
155. (PAYNE) HALL (1)
156. (POLLOCK) BELL (1)
157. (PYRON) MYLES (1)
158. (REECE) MYLES (1)
159. (REED) SAWYER (1)
160. (ROBINSON) COOKE (1)
161. (ROBINSON) LAPOINTE (1)
162. (ROBINSON) SEARCY (1)
163. (RODRIGUEZ) GANISON (1)
164. (SALTER) MCMILLON (1)
165. (SANFORD) BRUNSON (1)
166. (SAWYER) NIMELY (1)
167. (SIMMONS) BARBEE (1)
168. (SIMMONS) BROWN (1)
169. (SIMMONS) DABNEY (1)
170. (SIMMONS) GINN WALKER (1)
171. (SIMMONS) HARRIS (1)
172. (SIMMONS) HILL (1)
173. (SIMMONS) MILLER (1)
174. (SIMMONS) MYLES DAVIS (1)
175. (SIMMONS) ROBINSON (1)
176. (SIMMONS) WILLIS (1)
177. (SOMMERS) GRUNDY (1)
178. (TABOR) SIMMONS (1)
179. (THOMAS) DEVOULD CORBIN (1)
180. (WALTON) PITTMAN (1)
181. (WASHINGTON) MYLES (1)
182. (WATKINS) STOKES (1)
183. (WATSON) MYLES (1)
184. (WHEELER) ADAMS (1)
185. (WHEELER) DORSEY (1)
186. (WHEELER) EVANS (1)
187. (WHEELER) FRANKLIN (1)
188. (WILSON) WASHINGTON (1)
189. (WOLFERSBERGER) ELDRIDGE (1)
190. (WRIGHT) SIMMONS (1)
191. BARBEE (1)
192. BETTS (1)
193. BROWN JR. (1)
194. CHANNEY (1)
195. CUMMINGS (1)
196. DAMANI (1)
197. DEVOULD (1)
198. DISHMAN (1)
199. DORSEY (1)
200. ELTON (1)
201. EVANS (1)
202. FRANTZ (1)
203. FRIDAY (1)
204. GANTT (1)
205. GILLESPIE (1)
206. GREER (1)
207. GROSSMAN MYLES (1)
208. HENRY (1)
209. HILL (1)
210. HUMPHREY (1)
211. JIMMERSON (1)
212. LITTLE (1)
213. LOVEY (1)
214. MCGUIRE (1)
215. MIMS (1)
216. MITCHELL (1)
217. MOORE (1)
218. MORAN (1)
219. NIMELY (1)
220. OAKES (1)
221. PAYNE (1)
222. PEEPLES (1)
223. POLLOCK (1)
224. ROBERTSON (1)
225. RODRIGUEZ (1)
226. SHERROD (1)
227. SHUMATE (1)
228. SYKES (1)
229. TAYLOR (1)
230. TOLIVER (1)
231. WAGNER (1)
232. WASHINGTON-BROWN (1)
233. WHITSON (1)
234. WILSON (1)

– See more at: http://familyandkin.com/genealogy/surnames100.php?topnum=1000&tree=familyandkin#sthash.esbxKYJ9.dpuf

THIRD COUSIN ONCE REMOVED

?? THIRD COUSIN ONCE REMOVED ??

Just who is your third cousin once removed? your great-grandaunt? your sibling? your cousin-german? What exactly is a half-sister, a step-brother? If a child has the same name as his father, can you correctly call him “the second” if you don’t like “junior“? Is there a difference between a genealogy and a family history? Now that the search for “roots” is a national pastime, these questions are plaguing more and more people. Of course, many of the terms used to express family relationships are well-known and used dully: father, grandmother, uncle, sister and so on. But let us take a look at some of the lesser used terms.

SIBLINGS: Siblings are the children of the same parents. It is a convenient term meaning “brothers and sisters”. If you have two brothers and one sister, you have three siblings.

SPOUSE: Another convenient term meaning “husband or wife”.

STEP-: If your parents are parted (death, divorce, annulment) and one of your parents renames, his/her new spouse then becomes your stepmother/father. If your stepparent had also been previously married and had had children by that first marriage, those children now become your stepbrothers/ sisters. Because they have completely different parents than you, your stepbrothers/sisters are not related to you “‘by blood”’ but are related by “extended family ties”.

HALF-: If your remarried parent and your stepparent have children, those children are your half brothers/sisters. Because you have one parent in common, you are partly (half) related “by blood”.

IN-LAWS: If your brother or sister gets married, his/her new spouse becomes your sister-in-law or brother-in-law, but the family of your new sister(brother)-in-law does not become related to you, only in-laws to your newly married sibling. When you marry, however, you do acquire a whole family of in-laws of your own. Your new mate’s family now become your father-in-law, mother-in-law, sister- or brother-in-law. In-laws, like step-relatives, are not related “by blood” but by “extended family ties”. Note that the term sister- or brother-in-law is used both for your spouse’s sibling and for your sibling’s spouse.

GRANDNIECE/NEPHEW: The children of your siblings are your nieces and nephews. The children of your nieces/nephews (your siblings’ grandchildren) are your grandnieces/nephews, and their children are your great-grandnieces/nephews. Grand-nieces/nephews are also sometimes called great-nieces/nephews, and great-grandnieces/nephews are also called great-great-nieces/nephews.

GRANDAUNT/UNCLE: The siblings of your parents are your aunts/uncles. The siblings of your grandparents were originally termed grandaunts/uncles and the siblings of your great-grand parents were great-grandaunts/uncles. But over the years those terms have gradually been replaced by the less descriptive great-aunt/uncle for grandaunt/uncle and great-great-aunt/uncle for great-grandaunt/uncle. Because it is more logical, many modern genealogists still prefer to use the older terms. Either is correct.

COUSINS: The children of siblings are first cousins. Thus your children are first cousins to both your nieces nephews and your spouse’s nieces/nephews. But your nieces nephews and those of your spouse are not related to each other because their parents are not related. First cousins are also called full cousins or cousins-german. Children of first cousins are second cousins, and their children are third cousins and so on down through the generations. But what is the relationship of your child to your great-grandniece? Or of your great-grandchild to your grandnephew? Here is where we use the “removes”. To understand “removed”, it is important to keep the generations in order.

A simple diagram is an excellent method of doing this.

Let us imagine that TELLY has a son TELLY JR., a grand-daughter TEYANNA, a great-granddaughter LATRESSA and a sister TOMIRIKA.

TOMIRIKA has a child DEBORAH, a grandchild Robert and a great-grand-daughter JOYCE.

PARENTS

|

TELLY — siblings — TOMIRIKA

|
|

TELLY JR. — 1st Cousins — DEBORAH

|
|

TEYANNA — 2nd Cousins – ROBERT

|
|

LATRESSA — 3rd Cousins – JOYCE

We can now sketch a diagram to show that relationship. To determine TELLY JR.’s relationship to JOYCE, look at the diagram. TELLY JR. and DEBORAH are first cousins. Any descendant of DEBORAH is still a first cousin to TELLY JR. but each generation is one “remove”. Thus for TELLY JR., Robert is a first cousin one generation removed, a term usually shortened to “once removed”, and JOYCE is then TELLY JR.’s first cousin twice removed. The same holds for second, third, etc. cousins.

Robert is a second cousin to TEYANNA so he is a second cousin once removed to LATRESSA. Once while working on our family genealogy, I visited an eighth cousin once removed! Now that is a distant cousin (her great-grandfather and my great grandfather were brothers in the 17th century!). Strangely enough, although our relationship was so very distant, we found we were kindred spirits sharing many hobbies and pleasures. Our similar interests even extended to our enjoyment of jigsaw puzzles. When I mentioned I was a “real puzzle nut”, her husband laughed and led me to a closet filled floor to ceiling with puzzles just like my closet at home 3000 miles away We even had many of the same puzzles.

NAMESAKES: If your name is TELLY Henry Doe and you name your son TELLY Henry Doe, you then become Senior (Sr.) and your son Junior (Jr.), not the second (II). If your son TELLY Henry Doe, Jr. names his son (your grandson) the same, his son then becomes ‘the third”’, i.e. TELLY Henry Doe III.

However, if you name your son Richard Henry or TELLY Harold, anything but TELLY Henry Doe, but he still names his son (your grandson) after you, your grandson then becomes TELLY Henry Doe II. Likewise if your brother Edward Charles Doe names his son after you, that child (your nephew) would also be TELLY Henry Doe II. A ‘junior” always has the same name as his father whereas “the second” is not named for his father but does have the same name as an older relative (grandfather, uncle, cousin, etc.). The ‘third” is the third descendant in a family with the same name in either direct or indirect line. In everyday practice, the Sr., Jr., III are often only used when all parties are living but genealogically it is important to maintain the correct title to prevent confusion. One of the most peculiar cases I ever came across was in my own family genealogy. A fore-bearer named Kenny had several children including a son named Kenny. When his first wife died, he remarried and had another son. His second wife also insisted on naming her son Kenny after his father. The boys were only about seven years apart in age. It must have been most confusing —a father with two sons, Kenny #1 and Kenny #2

GENEALOGY versus FAMILY HISTORY: Although currently the two terms are frequently used interchangeably, there is a difference between a genealogy and a family history. A genealogy starts with one ancestor, most often the original immigrant to the United States, and traces all his descendants to the present time. If that ancestor arrived on these shores in colonial times, you can imagine the hundreds and hundreds of descendants he now probably has and what a mammoth task it must be to find even half of them! A family history starts with yourself (or your children) and moves back through your two parents, four grandparents, eight great-grandparents, sixteen great-great-grandparents, thirty-two great-grandparents, etc. spreading out fanlike to discover all the people from whom you are descended, not just names and dates but preferably information about their lives and backgrounds. Most genealogy courses offered today concentrate mostly on techniques for a family history rather than a genealogy. However, many of the methods can be used for both.

MATERNAL/PATERNAL RELATIVES:
In our English language, we do not differentiate between the maternal (mother’s) and paternal (father’s) sides of the family as is done in some languages. While this is handy for common speech, it can be frustrating to genealogist or family history researcher. For example, if you found an old family letter which wrote of “my grandmother returning to her home in Smithtown”, you could not be sure whether it referred to the writer’s maternal or paternal grandmother. If the letter had been written in–say Swedish– the word for “grandmother” would have been either “mormor” (mother’s mother) or “farmor” (father’s mother) and it would have been clear.

Who the dickens is your third cousin once removed?
Now you know that he/she is your mother’s third cousin, that their great-grandparents were siblings. (To check that answer, look back at the cousin diagram and imagine yourself as LATRESSA’s daughter. JOYCE, your mother’s third cousin, is your third cousin once removed.) Who is your cousin-german, your sibling, your great-grandaunt? Now you can answer all those questions presented in the opening paragraph. Hopefully the intricate nomenclature for the many and varied family relationships within a family is now more comprehendible and will aid you if you are one of the thousands of Americans personalizing history by searching out their ancestors.

Marriage Family and Kinship

Marriage Family and Kinship

Marriage is an institution that admits men and women to family life. Edward Westermarck defined marriage as the more or less durable connection between male and female lasting beyond the mere act of propagation till after the birth of offspring. Lowie defined it as a relatively permanent bond between permissible mates. Malinowski defined marriage as a contract for the production and maintenance of children. According to Lundberg Marriage consists of the rules and regulations that define the rights, duties and privileges of husband and wife with respect to each other. According to Horton and Hunt marriage is the approved social pattern whereby two or more persons establish a family. According to Anderson and Parker marriage are the sanctioning by a society of a durable bond between one or more males and one or more females established to permit sexual intercourse for the implied purpose of parenthood. According to John Levy and Ruth Monroe people get married because of the feeling that being in a family is the only proper indeed the only possible way to live. People do not marry because it is their social duty to perpetuate the institution of family or because the scriptures recommend matrimony but because they lived in a family as children and cannot get over the feeling that being in a family is the only proper way to live in society.

Other Names That Sound a Bit Like Myles

Other names that sound a bit like Myles

The name Myles is a baby boy name.

Irish Meaning:
The name Myles is an Irish baby name. In Irish the meaning of the name Myles is: Servant.

American Meaning:
The name Myles is an American baby name. In American the meaning of the name Myles is: Servant.

English Meaning:
The name Myles is an English baby name. In English the meaning of the name Myles is: Merciful.

Latin Meaning:
The name Myles is a Latin baby name. In Latin the meaning of the name Myles is: Soldier.

Greek Meaning:
The name Myles is a Greek baby name. In Greek the meaning of the name Myles is: Destroyer.

Hebrew Meaning:
The name Myles is a Hebrew baby name. In Hebrew the meaning of the name Myles is: Who is like God? Gift from God.

Numerology
SoulUrge Number: 5
People with this name have a deep inner desire for travel and adventure, and want to set their own pace in life without being governed by tradition.

Expression Number: 2
People with this name tend to be quiet, cooperative, considerate, sympathetic to others, adaptable, balanced and sometimes shy. They are trustworthy, respecting the confidences of others, and make excellent diplomats, mediators and partners. They are often very intuitive. They like detail and order, and often find change worrisome. They may sometimes feel insecure or restless.

 

Mahalek, Mailes, Mailloux, Malacio, Malawski, Malayosa, Malchou, Malchow, Malec, Malecha, Maleck, Malecki, Malecky, Malek, Males, Malesky, Malick, Malicki, Malik, Malis, Malise, Malizia, Malkie, Mallek, Malloch, Mallock, Mallows, Mallozzi, Malocco, Maloche, Maloich, Malosh, Malueg, Malus, Malusa, Malyj, Meals, Mehelic, Mehelich, Mehlig, Melaccio, Melchi, Melesk, Meleski, Melhouse, Melhuish, Melhus, Melick, Melissa, Melius, Melledge, Mellhuish, Mellick, Mellis, Mellish, Mellowes, Mellows, Melluish, Mellwig, Meloche, Meloque, Melosh, Mielke, Mieloch, Mihelic, Mihelich, Milassi, Milazzo, Milch, Miles, Milewski, Milich, Milicua, Milius, Milk, Milks, Milladge, Millage, Milledge, Millhouse, Millice, Millick, Millidge, Millis, Millius, Mills, Millus, Milos, Milosh, Mleko, Mlika, Molag, Molash, Moles, Molko, Mollica, Mollsee, Molski, Molz, Moules, Moullas, Moulse, Mowles, Moyles, Mulac, Mulcahey, Mulcahy, Mulchahey, Mulchay, Mulick, Mulik, Mulju, Mulkey, Mulleague, Mulles, Mullica, Mullis, Mulliss, Mulloch, Mullock, Mulso, Mulys

Myles

Last name: Myles

This interesting name is of French origin, introduced into England by the Normans after 1066 in the form Miles, thought to derive from the Germanic personal name Mild, itself possibly akin to the Slavic element “mil”, mercy. In English documents of the Middle Ages, the name normally appears in the Latin form Milo, but the usual medieval form would have been Mile, so we assume that the final “s” must represent the possessive ending of “son of” or “servant of Mile”. As a surname Miles is ambiguous, as the latin word for a soldier is “Miles”. On June 25th 1553, Thomas Myles married Elisabeth Myllar in St. Stephen’s, Coleman Street, London. William Mylas was christened on July 9th 1568 in St. Andrew’s, Undershaft, London. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Nicholas Miles, which was dated 1177, Pipe Rolls of Sussex, during the reign of King Henry II, The Builder of Churches, 1154 – 1189. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to “develop” often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

10 tips to start your family history journey

10 tips to start your family history journey

Follow these tips on how to find family history without having to browse multiple ancestry sites to build your family tree. Our genealogy experts compiled advice to get you started with your family search  and answer some of the most asked family history questions.

1. Start your family tree

Your immediate family often holds the key to starting your family history research. Record the memories of your parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles, siblings, and cousins as you start exploring your family tree online. Ask each relative about specific individuals and gather details surrounding their lives including nicknames, places they lived, vital information (including birth, marriage, and death dates), occupations, and other important clues. Enjoy a free questionnaire below to get started with your family history.

Download a questionnaire to interview your relatives.

2. Search your home for scrapbooks

Family scrapbooks often yield important clues for family history research. Examine your home for vital records (birth certificates), school records, family bibles, diaries and letters, old photographs, and memorabilia boxes that tell stories about your family.

3. Start with the family history basics

Use your initial research for your first searches and then analyze your results to achieve a personal success strategy. Following the family history golden rules will help you become a more efficient researcher and hopefully lead to greater rewards in your family search. We discuss how the Census records can help you in Step 7.

Your Family Tree

4.Start your online family tree

Build your online family tree to organize your results. Keeping your research and records organized is important as you continue to find new details related to your family. Enter important information, including names, dates, and places to build a solid foundation as you continue exploring your family history.

Your Family Tree
Build your family tree with our online family tree builder

5. Start with a family story

When building your family tree, identify a potential story about family that you are interested to begin exploring.  Aim to uncover both newspaper archives and records relating to your family’s stories in your research.

Stories can include military service (such as exploring World War I military service records), occupational stories (memories of a first paycheck or time spent as a Merchant Marine), educational memories (attending high school or college) or a family legend (being descendant from a prominent individual in American history or confirm stories of a renegade ancestor with detailed criminal records).

6. Join the family history conversation

Join a network of family historians both experienced and new on social networking resources (like findmypast’s Facebook and Twitter) to make new connections and gain insight on how to expand your family history resources.

Staying tuned to the findmypast.com blog for latest record updates and podcasts to help expand your family history search. Read genealogy articles and watch youtube videos related to family history to start building your knowledge base of records and methods for tracing your family tree.

7. Search the U.S. census

The U.S. Federal census is the largest resource for family history and is a solid starting place for examining your family tree. Starting with the newly released 1940 US census, trace parents and grandparents through the census, recording their names, ages, birthplaces, immigration details, occupations, and residences as your build out your family tree.

US Census
Search the US Census starting in 1790.

8. Search one family story at a time

Focus on one or two families at a time to help organize your research and increase your productivity.  Select one or two families that interest you, rather than trying to tackle your entire family tree at once. Spend time gathering information and documenting your family in small pieces as you work towards the larger goal of filling out your family tree.

Learn how to then “connect the dots” by following family members on their journey to America through the U.S. census, passenger lists and naturalization papers.

9. Gather materials from relatives

Your relatives will likely have important resources in their homes that can assist your search. Family bibles, letters, certifications, and other important materials might be only a phone call away. Some family members might have old genealogical information from other relatives who have also worked on the family history that can help jumpstart your search.

10. Find a Family History Society

Connect with other genealogists and family historians through a local genealogical society or family history event in your area. You can also post questions to findmypast’s facebook online for others to answer when you need help with your research.  Attending local classes about family tree research, family history records, and how to avoid brick walls is an important step to finding answers for beginners and advanced genealogists alike.

How To Begin Tracing Your Family Tree

How To Begin Tracing Your Family Tree

1. Begin your family tree by gathering together everything you have — papers, photos, documents and family heirlooms. Rummage through your attic or basement, the filing cabinet, the back of the closet…. Then check with your relatives to see if they have any family documents they are willing to share. Clues to your family history might be found on the backs of old photographs, in the family bible, or even on a postcard. If your relative is uneasy with lending an original, offer to have copies made.

2. While you’re collecting family records, set aside some time to interview your relatives. Start with Mom and Dad and then move on from there. Try to collect stories, not just names and dates, and be sure to ask open-ended questions. Try these questions to get you started. Interviews may make you nervous, but this is probably the most important step in researching your family history. It may sound cliche, but don’t put it off until it’s too late!

3. Write down everything you have learned from your family and begin to enter the information in a pedigree or family tree chart. If you’re unfamiliar with these traditional family tree forms, you can find step by step instructions in filling out genealogical forms. These charts provide an at-a-glance overview of your family, making it easy to track your research progress.
4. Select a single surname, individual, or family with which to begin. Focusing your family history search helps keep your research on track, and reduces the chance of missing important details due to sensory overload. As much as you might want to, you can’t do it all at once.

5. Explore the Internet for information and leads on your ancestors. Good places to start include pedigree databases, message boards, and resources specific to your ancestor’s location. If you’re new to using the Internet for genealogy research, start with Six Strategies for Finding Your Roots Online. Not sure where to start first? Then follow the research plan in 10 Steps for Finding Your Family Tree Online. Just don’t expect to find your entire family tree in one place!

6. Visit your local Family History Center where you can access the world’s largest collection of genealogical information.

7. Look for the records of your ancestors including wills; birth, marriage and death records; land deeds; immigration records; etc.

8. Organize your new information — take notes, make photocopies, etc. Make sure you save and date everything!

9. Visit the place where your family lived — look at cemeteries, courthouses, churches, etc. for information.

10. Make sure you continue to document everything, including taking pictures. You never know when you might need it.

11. When you have gone as far as you can go, step back and take a break — then go to Step #4 and choose a new ancestor to start searching for.

12. Remember to have fun!

How Do I Start My Family Tree?

How Do I Start My Family Tree?

Start with Yourself

1. Always, always, start with yourself and work backwards- record all your family history knowledge, root through all your photos documents and start scanning and organizing them.

Interview the Living

2. Ask your relatives for information – the most valuable and free resource you can have is the knowledge and information your living relatives have about their ancestors. Don’t under estimate this step. Take the time to interview your living relatives and record this knowledge in your family tree.

Choose a Software Program and Online Site

3. Choose a free online site to help you organize your information, my recommendation is My Heritage.com. This site  provides a free download of family tree software to organize your information, they also offer search capabilities, message boards, and the ability to create your own family history website. It is a great all inclusive site to start your family history for free.

Choose Your Focus Person

4. Choose a relative you wish to learn more about- after organizing your information and setting up a family tree, choose an ancestor you wish to learn more about. Focus on what information you have on that individual and identify what information you are missing before heading out to the internet to find your answers.

Post on Message Boards and Forums

5. Visit websites that offer message boards and forums and begin posting on  in specific terms what you are looking for, this is a great way to pull cousins out of the woodwork. A great message board to start with is Rootsweb World Connect Project or GenForum Message Boards.

Create Your Tree Online

6. Post your tree online at numerous locations. The more sites that you post your tree to the better chance you have of uncovering a family tree that may cross branches with your tree. Sites like Tribal Pages and My Heritage,  are great places to start and both are free. However, tread cautiously when viewing other trees, if there is no citation offered than be weary of copying any information. Other trees can offer leads into expanding your search but are not consider a primary source. The more websites you post your tree to, the more you increase your chances of meeting a distant cousin.

Search for Published Family History Books

7. Look for published family histories, you just may get lucky and find others who have gone before you and have all ready published a family history book. Check online digital libraries such as Google Books or  Our Roots. You just might strike gold.

Visit a Variety of Free Databases

8. Begin your search with free databases, continue to focus on your individual, websites such as familysearch.org and ancestry.com (the free trial option) can quickly uncover some new information. However, don’t discount more specific types of databases such as immigration databases, like Ellis Island or Ship’s List, cemetery online databases such as Dead Fred or Find a Grave and newspaper databases such as newpaperarchive.com  or Google News Archive Search.

Standardizing Place Names in my Genealogy Database

Standardizing Place Names in my Genealogy Database

I’m almost to the point of trying to standardize all of the place names in my genealogy database.

Researchers are advised by the experts to keep historical place names and jurisdictions in our database so that the place identifications at the time of the records are maintained.  Some software programs deal with this by providing a “Description” box wherein a historical name, an address, a hospital name, a cemetery name, or a note about record jurisdiction, could be placed.  An alternative is to put the historical location in a person’s note or in a place note, record, or to put the historical location in the source citation detail or note.

 

Amman, Jordan
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Apple Valley, California
Arkansas
Augusta, Georgia
Austin, Texas
Baldwin, Mississippi
Battle Creek, Michigan
Beat 1, Harrison Town, Tallahatchie, Mississippi
Birmingham, AL
Birmingham, Alabama
Black Oak Township, Crittenden, Arkansas
Blytheville, Arkansas
Boston, MA
Bridgeport, Connecticut
Browning, Mississippi
California
Camp Pendleton, California
Carlisle, Ky
Carmichael, California
Carroll County, Mississippi
Carroll Cty, Mississippi
Carroll, Mississippi
Cheyenne, Wyoming
Chicago, Cook Cty., Illinois
Chicago, Cook, Illinois
Chicago, Illinois
Chula Vista, California
Clear Lake, Arkansas
Cleveland, Ohio
Columbus, GA
Columbus, Ohio
Coppell, Texas
Corey, Mississippi
Crystal Springs, Mississippi
Dale City, Virginia
Dallas, Texas
Dix Hills, New York
Dixmoor, Illinois
Dyersburg, Dyer, Tennessee
East St Louis, illinois
Eastover, South Carolina
Flowood, Mississippi
Flowood, MS
Flushing, Michigan
Ford Heights, Illinois
Fort Gison, Muskogee, Oklahoma
Fort Wayne, Indiana
Gary, Indiana
Gary, Lake, Indiana
Georgia
Glen Allen, Mississippi
Greensboro, North Carolina
Greenville, Mississippi
Greenville, MS
Greenville, Washington, Mississippi
Greenwood, Leflore, Mississippi
Harvey, Illinois
Haywood County, Tennessee
Haywood, Tennessee
Hernando, Mississippi
Highland, California
Hoffman Estates, Illinois
Hollandale, Mississippi
Houston, Texas
Illinois
Jackson, Mississippi
Jackson, MS
Joliet, Will County, Illinois
Kalamazoo, Michigan
Kansas City, Kansas
Kentucky
Las Vegas, Nevada
Leflore, Mississippi
Lewisville, Texas
Louisiana
Luxora, Arkansas
Lynwood, Illinois
Macon, Noxubee, Mississippi
Marion County, Kentucky
Marion, Arkansas
Marion, Indiana
Maryland
McGehee, Arkansas
Melrose, Massachusetts
Memphis, TN
Minter City, Mississippi
Mississippi
MN
MO
New Bern, Craven, North Carolina
New Rochelle, New York
New York
Norfolk, Virginia
North Carolina
Norwalk, California
Oak Forest, Cook, Illinois
Otto Mall, Illinois
Paw Paw, Michigan
Phoenix, Arizona
Portsmouth, Virginia
Red Oaks, Texas
Redbird, Wagoner, Oklahoma
Riverside Cemetary
Sacramento, California
Sauk Village, Illinois
Scotts, Mississippi
Scottsdale, AZ
Seattle, King, Washington
South Bend, Indiana
South Chicago Heights, Illinois
South Haven, Michigan
Suffolk, Virginia
Tallahatchie, Mississippi
Tallahtchie County, Mississippi
Tennesse
Tennessee
Toledo, Ohio
Tulsa, OK
Tunica, Mississippi
Tustin, California
Vicksburg, Mississippi
Vicksburg, MS
Vicksburg, Warren, Mississippi
Virginia
Vista, California
Ward 2, Greenville, Beat 3, Washington, Mississippi, United States
West Memphis, Arkansas
Wheatley Heights, New York

Given name

A given name (also known as a personal name, first name, forename, or Christian name) is a part of a person’s full nomenclature. It identifies a specific person, and differentiates that person from other members of a group, such as a family or clan, with whom that person shares a common surname. The term given name refers to the fact that the name is bestowed upon, or given to a child, usually by its parents, at or near the time of birth. This contrasts with a surname (also known as a family name, last name, or gentile name), which is normally inherited, and shared with other members of the child’s immediate family.

Given names are often used in a familiar and friendly manner in informal situations. In more formal situations the surname is more commonly used, unless it is necessary to distinguish between people with the same surname. The idioms “on a first-name basis” and “being on first-name terms” allude to the familiarity of addressing another by a given name.

 

Aaliyah
Aaron
Addie
Addie Cornelius
A’Drayis
Ahnissah
Aiden
Airanna
Aisha
Alaiyah L.
Alberta
Albus
Alexis NeCole
Alice
Allen
Amari
Amy
Anderson / Addie
Anderson Clemon
Andrea
Andrew Tayler
Angela
Ann
Anna Bell
Annette
Annick Siagbe
Annie M
Anthony
Anthony D.
Anthony Duchaunte
Anthony J
Anthony L.
Antinia Mariah Malon
Antoinette
Anya
April
Archie L.
Areonna Zyaire Maree
Argetha
Arlene
Arquilla
Ashley
Assata
Atiba
Aurora
Ayanna Sade
Ayrika T.
Baylon
Belinda
Benjamin
Benjimin
Bernice E.
Bessie
Bettie
Betty Mae
Beverly
Beverly
Beverly Jean
Billy
Birchie
Bishop James
Bobby
Brandon
Breanna
Brenda
Brenda F. Aka See
Brian
Bryttani
Burrell
Buster
Buster W
Buster W.
Caleb
Caline
Calise Marie
Cameren
Cardela
Carissa
Carl
Carl
Carl Edward
Carol Joann
Caroline
Carrie Bell
Catherine
Catherine
Cathryn L.
Cathy
Cedric
Celeste D
Cevion Donyel
Chance
Charles
Charles
Charles W.
Charlotte
Charmaine
Cheryl Catherine
Christian Sinde
Christina
Christopher
Christopher Isaiah
Chyvon
Clarence
Clarence D
Claudette
Cleora
Consuelo
Cora M.
Courtney
Cynthia
Cynthia
Dai-Anna Ashleigh Maree
Dallas
Damon
Dan
Daniel
Darius
Darrell
Darrian
Daryl
DaShawn
David
Deasia
Deborah
Deborah Eloise
Dekendrick
Delores
Demarcus Carl
Demetria
Dennis
Dennis
Derrick
Destiny
Diamond
Diamond Sahadrine
Diana
Dinah C.
Donald
Donna Marie
Donnie
Doris
Dorothea
Dorothy
Duane Walter
Duke
Dylan
Earnest
Ebony Yovonne
Eda
Eddie A.
Eddie Lee
Edgar
Edmond
Edna
Edward
Edward G.
Eli
Elias
Elizabeth
Ellen
Elma
Elton
Elton
Elvira
Emaline
Emma
Eric
Eric
Eric Ray
Eric Talanda
Erica
Erica
Erika
Erin Lenore
Ethel
Etta
Eugene
Evelyn Ann
Fairold
Fakie
Fannie
Fannie Ruth
Felecia
Felicia Arnetta
Finis
firstname
Foda
Francine
Francis Myrtle
Frank
Fred
Freda
Freddie
Frederick
Frederick
Frederick D.
Frederika
Fuby
Gabe
Gail L.
Galloway
Ganell Pam
Gary
George
George Allen
George E.
George James Michael
Gerome
Gertrude
Gertrude
Gloria Jean
Gregory Diquna
Gwendlynn
Gwendolyn
Hahn
Hannah
Harriet
Hattie
Haze
Hazel
Helen
Helen
Hembrick
Henretta
Henrietta
Henrietta  / Henretta
Henrietta F
Henry
Henry
Henry Christopher
Henryetta
Herman
Hester
Horace
Howard
Howard
Ida
Idella
Ike
Inez
Irene
Iris
Isaac
Isaiah
Isier
Isilena / Isolina
J B
Jackie
Jacob
Jacqueline
Jacquelyn Louise
Jake
Jalen
Jamal
James
James
James Albert
James E.
James Howard
James Lafayette
James R.
James Richard
Jane
Janice
Janice
Jarell
Jasmin
Jasmine
Jason
Javon
Javon
Jaxen Newell
Jay
Jayden
Jayden Izaiah
Jayden LaMar Lee
Jeff
Jennifer
Jerri-Anne
Jesse B
Jesse Rebbeca
Jessica
Jessica Carmel
Jessie
Jessie May
Joann
Joe
Joelle
John
John Edward
John Gregory
John Henry
John Shepard
John Shepard / Skip
John Sullivan
John W.
Johnie D.
Johnny
Johnny Mae
Johnny Robert
Jonathan
Jonna
Jordan
Joseph
Joseph Lee
Josh W.
Joshua Matthew
Joshua W.
Joyce
Joyce A.
Juanita Aldrena
Jude
Judith
Julius
K Charles
K. Charles
Kaitlynne
Karen L
Karen M.
Karrie
Kassie
Kayon D.
Kelley A.
Kelly
Kendall
Kenneth
Kenneth Ray
Kenneth Ray
Kevin
Kevin C
KeYanna
Killo
Kim
Kimberly
Kimberly
Kimberly Brown
Kimberly E
Kyla
LaDonya
Lance
Lance Odesters
Larry
LaTressa D.
Lavon
Lawrence Cecil
Leah
Leah Mae
Leilani
Lenora
Leo Benard
Lera Mae
Leroy
Leroy J.
Lia NeCole Sallie
Lilian
Limmie Ray
Linda
Linda Marie
Lion
Living
Lois
Lonnie
Lorena
Lori D.
Lorie
Lorraine Esther
Lou S.
Loula
Love
Lucille
Lucinda
Luvinia
Lydia
Mack
Madie
Maggie
Mahaley
Mahalia
Mai
Makayla
Malik Isaiah
Malinda
Manual
Manuel
Manuel LaJuan
Marc
Marcus
Mariah
Marianne
Marie
Marilyn L.
Marilynn
Marion
Marlena Viola
Marline
MarQuaries D.
Marquette
Marquis
Marshall
Martha
Martin
Martin T.
Martina
Marvell
Marvin
Marvin M
Mary
Mary
Mary Ann
Mary Bell
Mary Bell
Mary Bell “Zella”
Maurice
May J
Mcclendon
Mecca
Melanie Nicole
Melvin
Melvina
Mertis
Michael
Michael
Michael L.
Michelle
Michelle L.
Miles
Miles Luther
Milton
Modie
Montay
Montayvia
Morgan H
Mose
Moses
Myles
Myles
Nah
Nancy
Naviah
Neal Isaac
Nicole
Norman
Octavious / Octavia
Odell
Omar
Ophelia
Oscar
Oseana
Pare
Paul
Paula
Paula
Paulina
Pauline
Perry
Pete
Peter
Phibby
Phyllis Elaine
Pinkie Louise
Prentis
Prince-Jaysean
Princess-Dominiquecole
Prince-Tye Gerad Walker
Priscilla
Pugh
Qiana
Queen
R. C.
Rachael
Rachael
Rachal
Rachel S
Rachel S.
Rainy
Rakin
Ralph
Randel
Rasheedah
Rasheena
Rashita Darshall
Remiyah Saphyre Leilani
Richard  Xavier
Richard Leon
Rickey W.
Robert
Robert Lewis
Robert S.
Robynne Leilani
Rodney C.
Rodrick
Roosevelt
Rosevelt
Rosie
Rosvelt
Roxanne
Ruben
Rudolph
Rudolph Christine
Sallie
Sallie
Sallie E
Sallie Mae
Sally or Sallie Mae
Sam
Sam Ella
Samantha
Samuel
Samuel Myles
Samuel W.
Sandra
Sandra
Sarah
Sarah M.
Saul
Scott
Scottie
Sean T.
Sene
Seth
Shaeron N.
Shameenah
Sharee
Shari
Sharon
Shawn
Shayla
Shayvione
Sheila
Sheila Lucille
Shelia Elaine
Sheniko Shenea
Sherry
Sheryl
Sheryl E.
Shirley
Shirley Ann
Shuan Q
Sierra
Simpson
Skyler
Smith
Sonya T.
Sophronie
Stanley
Stella
Stephanie
Stephen Drew
Stephen Edward
Steve
Steven
Susan
Susana
Sydney Geanes
Sylvia
Tamala Gilbert
Tameko N
Tamiko R.
Tammie Antoinette
Tanetta
TeLaiyah C. L.
Tellessa A. R.
Tellesson P. S,
Telly B.
Teresa
Teresa
TeShaibrah K. S.
Thomas
Thomas
Timothy
Timothy
Tobie Hardy
Tom
Tomirika LeAndra
Tommie Lee
Toni Marie
Tonya
Travis
Tricia
Trinia
Turissa
Twala
Tyanna
Tye’Liaah Lucinda
Tyira
Tyler Erin
Typhani
Tyrechia
Tyrone
Tyrone Karl
Unknown
Valerie
Vera
Vernon
Vicki Lee
Viola
Virgie
Virgie B
Walter
Wanda
Whitney
Will
William
William
William Gerald
William Henry
William K
William L.
Willie
Yolanda
Zaneta
Zaza
Zelphia Ann
Zenobia
Zyen Myaire