Miles Luther SIMMONS Newspaper Clipping

Miles Luther SIMMONS Newspaper Clipping

Citing this Record

“Illinois, Cook County, Obituaries, ca. 1970-1990,” database with images, Miles Simmons Sr, 1979; citing Cook, Illinois, United States, South Suburban Genealogical and Historical Society, South Holland; FHL microfilm 1,907,511.

Miles Luther SIMMONS Newspaper Clipping
Miles Luther SIMMONS Newspaper Clipping

Types of Family Structures

Types of Family Structures

 

Family Structures

The following types of families exist today, with some families naturally falling into multiple categories. For example, a single parent family who lives in a larger, extended family. While these types of families are distinct in definition, in practice the lines are less clear.

Nuclear Family

The nuclear family is the traditional type of family structure. This family type consists of two parents and children. The nuclear family was long held in esteem by society as being the ideal in which to raise children. Children in nuclear families receive strength and stability from the two-parent structure and generally have more opportunities due to the financial ease of two adults. According to U.S. Census data, almost 70 percent of children live in a nuclear family unit.

SingleParent Family 

The single parent family consists of one parent raising one or more children on his own. Often, a single parent family is a mother with her children, although there are single fathers as well. The single parent family is the biggest change society has seen in terms of the changes in family structures. One in four children is born to a single mother. Single parent families are generally close and find ways to work together to solve problems, such as dividing up household chores. When only one parent is at home, it may be a struggle to find childcare, as there is only one parent working. This limits income and opportunities in many cases, although many single parent families have help from relatives and friends.

Extended Family

The extended family structure consists of two or more adults who are related, either by blood or marriage, living in the same home. This family includes many relatives living together and working toward common goals, such as raising the children and keeping up with the household duties. Many extended families include cousins, aunts or uncles and grandparents living together. This type of family structure may form due to financial difficulties or because older relatives are unable to care for themselves alone. Extended families are becoming increasingly common all over the world.

Childless Family

While most people think of family as including children, there are couples who either cannot or choose not to have children. The childless family is sometimes the “forgotten family,” as it does not meet the traditional standards set by society. Childless families consist of a husband and wife living and working together. Many childless families take on the responsibility of pet ownership or have extensive contact with their nieces and nephews as a substitute for having their own children.

Stepfamily

Over half of all marriages end in divorce, and many of these individuals choose to get remarried. This creates the stepfamily which involves two separate families merging into one new unit. It consists of a new husband and wife and their children from previous marriages or relationships. Stepfamilies are about as common as the nuclear family, although they tend to have more problems, such as adjustment periods and discipline issues. Stepfamilies need to learn to work together and also work with their exes to ensure these family units run smoothly.

Grandparent Family

Many grandparents today are raising their grandchildren for a variety of reasons. One in fourteen children is raised by his grandparents, and the parents are not present in the child’s life. This could be due to parents’ death, addiction, abandonment or being unfit parents. Many grandparents need to go back to work or find additional sources of income to help raise their grandchildren.

Average percent DNA shared between relatives

Average percent DNA shared between relatives

 

To help in interpreting your DNA Relatives results, the following summarizes the average percent DNA shared for different types of relationships according to our simulations. You may notice that several relationships share the same average percent DNA.

Relationship Average % DNA Shared Range
Identical Twin 100% N/A
Parent / Child
Full Sibling
50% Varies by specific relationship
Grandparent / Grandchild
Aunt / Uncle
Niece / Nephew
Half Sibling
25% Varies by specific relationship
1st Cousin 12.5% 7.31% – 13.8%
1st Cousin once removed 6.25% 3.3% – 8.51%
2nd Cousin 3.13% 2.85% – 5.04%
2nd Cousin once removed 1.5% 0.57% – 2.54%
3rd Cousin 0.78% 0.3% – 2.0%
4th Cousin 0.20% 0.07% – 0.5%
5th Cousin 0.05% Variable
6th Cousin 0.01% Variable

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